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Have you given your child the world? (Book review)

Call me superficial, but I really love a book that looks and feels good. (Yes, I do judge a book by it’s cover unless I am convinced of the quality of the author or was told to read it by a trusted friend.) Give Your Child the World, Raising globally minded kids one book at a time, written by Jamie Martin (a Connecticut resident, no less!) met my expectations. I was a little skeptical at first, because, as a homeschool mom, I don’t need another list of books that I need to get my kids to read. I have plenty of those. But I liked the angle this book takes. Martin and her husband feel that raising their kids with a global perspective is a good thing- and I agree, I hope my kids grow up loving something wonderful about this world God has made for them. 

If you’re part of the homeschool read-aloud community, you’ve probably come across a book that lists other books and begins with the word “Honey”. Although that is a great book (I have a copy on my shelf, in fact), GYCTW is different because it gives parents and educators a list of book suggestions categorized by continents and appropriate ages. Martin sticks with the theme of becoming global rather than all of the attributes of a child’s developing heart. She also lists whether the book has religious themes and two or three sentences about it. This is something I can sit with on my library’s website or take with me to the library and sort of plug & play with finding good books. She’s done the work for me. 

You can check out a podcast where Jamie is interviewed about her book on Read Aloud Revival (#48). 

Furthermore. (Whenever there is a furthermore, you should pay attention, right???!!!)
As someone who works with international students studying at one of America’s universities, I think every family who wants to host a student for dinner or for a season of life, needs to read this. The introduction ALONE is worth reading. When I train american families on how to host an international student in their home this upcoming school year, I plan on added this book to the training materials. 


Lastly, as a child born in the 80’s, when LeVar Burton tells me it is something I should read, my ears kind of perk up....and he says this is “an invaluable resource”. Ha, ha. Since CT is a super small state and the group of homeschooling parents is somewhat well connected, I hope I can find my way to having a cup of coffee with my new writer BFF, Jamie. 

Thank you BookLook for a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. 

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