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New Things Learned About CT

Things I have learned about Connecticut thus far:
- Do not expect to finding a shopping cart in the grocery store, unless you either (a) pay 25 cents, refundable when cart is returned, or (b) grab a carriage from the parking lot. Do not use the term "cart". Nobody knows what that is here.
- Expect to pay 60-70% more on most grocery items.
- People own snowblowers, just as Virginians own efficient air conditioning systems.
- Pay attention to the different prices on the sign at the gas station- one for the cash price and one for the credit card price. There is about a 10 cent difference. Lesson learned- keep gas cash in the car as much as possible.
- I only have to drive 26 minutes to the closest Sams Club, which beats the 1 hour trip I made in VA.
- There is a 30 cent (I think) fee for buying drinks in plastic, aluminum, or glass containers. You can turn in your containers and get your $ back at the grocery store.
- Teenage Connecticut drivers do not have to take a behind-the-wheel course. They may simply take a written test at the DMV and get a license.
- There are a surprising number of pick-up trucks, camouflage, and hunters in this portion of CT.

**I forgot one IMPORTANT thing!
- As a girl raised in VA, I had the assumption (and was often reminded before we moved) that northerners were cold, rude and brash. In the month that we've been here, I have not met a single person that fits that description! I realize that I am in a more rural place in the north, and perhaps people from the cities keep to themselves more. However, do not believe stereotypes about these Yankees!

Comments

  1. Haha sounds like some of the terminology problems I'm having! But that's scary about no behind-the-wheel testing!!! My sister and brother-in-law seriously tote multiple trash bags full of bottles and cans up there when they visit his family to cash them in.

    ReplyDelete
  2. What town were you in that made you pay for shopping carts? Also, I refer to them as carts sometimes.

    As far as the driving goes, all drivers have to have a certain amount of time behind the wheel with an instructor or parent. (For their license) For a permit, you just need to take a test.

    I had 4, 2 hour sessions, as well as an 'hour-log' quota that needed t be filled with practice driving before I was able to take my written test for my license and then the driving portion.

    I am glad you have broken the stereotypes of Northerners. Some of us are really quite nice. Just like everywhere, there are poo-faced people, and nice people. :]

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hey Samasaurus! The Aldi in Windham makes you pop a quarter into the slot before it releases a cart!

    Glad to hear that you use the same lingo!

    ReplyDelete

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