Skip to main content

SUCKERS! (8.15.11)

Our goal is to explore something each day while our schedules are slower. So, for our adventure today, the girls and I decided to plug in the address to the bank. We made our way to the other side of town and found the bank. I filled out the slips, handed it to the teller and waited for her to double check my math. To distract the girls from their impending boredom, I thought it would be a good idea to get them interested in a counting game. We counted to the bank tellers. We counted the computers. We counted the “this window closed” signs. We counted the money counter machines. We counted the cameras. At this point I began to wonder if the employees were considering me and my lunch-stained preschoolers a potential threat to their safety. Don’t all bank robbers take inventory of the possible items to confiscate or demolish before they strike? (This has absolutely nothing to do with my point, other than the fact that my kids were involved.) 

Finally, after what felt like an eternity, the teller came back with my receipt. My youngest asked if she could have a sucker. (We also counted the sucker storage devises in our game, so we KNEW they had them!) So, I asked her to ask the teller if she could have one. She looked at the teller and said,

“Can I have a sucker please?”. 

And with the biggest, most sincere smile in all history, the teller looked at me and asked me what she was talking about. Like an idiot, I repeated the child’s question, “she’d like to have a sucker, please.” 

Again, big-smiling-teller, still had no idea what we were asking for. Then it clicked. Perhaps we are using Virginia lingo in a Connecticut bank. If so, we have just sounded like the biggest hicks ever to arrive this far north successfully. I quickly flipped through my mental thesaurus and grabbed another term. 

“Lollipop?” 

“Oh, sure!” said the bank teller with the big smile. 
Connecticut vernacular lesson #1: Assume the term “sucker” means something other than the sweet confection on a paper stick. Use “lollipop” next time. 

Comments

  1. It certainly can seem like you're learning an entirely different language. No worries, you'll pick up on things very quickly.

    The term 'wicked' will be heard a lot... A LOT. Even our newscasters use it on air. It is quintessential New England. :]

    I'm trying to think of what else.

    You'll hear subs or grinders most likely.
    Because i cannot speak for all New Englander's, I will share with you things that I find most of us say different as compared to most Virginians:

    Ahem...


    Oregon (Oar-Ra-Gahn) I never heard Oar-Rih-Gihn until I lived in the South.

    Aunt... It is typically pronounced Ahnt, instead of Ant.

    We have basements... I only use the term cellar if it has a dirt floor (i.e. old farm houses with original rock steps leading to the cellar). Or in cases of wine cellars.

    Drug Store = Pharmacy

    Package Store or Packie = Liquor Store
    -Also alcohol is not sold on Sundays.

    Jimmies/shots = Sprinkles (all are used)

    Leaf Peepers- Our name for people who come to see the fall foliage, which won't be magnificent this year due to all of our rain :[

    Other terms that may or may not differ from what you say:

    We say soda instead of pop or cola.

    Sneakers most times in place of tennis shoes.

    Water fountains are also, drinking fountains, and bubblers.

    I say coo-pon, instead of Q-pon (you will hear both)

    Idea- typically not pronounced 'i-deer'

    crayon is cray-on, not usually cran.

    creek- like eek. Not crick.

    Hahaha, here's a decent site. Granted, depending on he context, I use 2 variations of some of these words...http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/state_CT.html

    For example, I sometimes say Care-uh-mel, but sometimes say car-muhl.

    Learning the differences and similarities is the best part.

    Let me know if you need anything at all! :]

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

New Campus Missionary's Survival Kit

You’ll need to following items to survive your first few semesters in Chi Alpha. Prep well and gather these essential items:
New XA Shirt- Promoting your new logo is a secondary benefit of new Chi Alpha shirts. You need to make sure you have many of these around because you won’t be able to do laundry for a solid three weeks. Use the wear & air method; wear it once, air it out, wear it again. When in Rome, right? 
Name tags- People think you need name tags to learn names. This rarely works, but we do it anyway. However, the pack of 500 name tags you’ll burn through is more there to remind you that this mission will begin to show you who the real you truly is, and more importantly, who God really is. Call on His name. We can’t do this gig without him, don’t try. 
Duct tape- Every seasoned campus missionary stashes a role of duct tape in their supply bag for ministry events because you never know what you will need to repair. This also comes in handy to tape your berks back together an…

I’m the reason the UPS guy has a new route

You need some backstory. It began when I was 15. My friends and I went on a Spring Break trip with a church youth group. One of us decided a quick game of softball would be a fun way to waste a few minutes. But that ended after the first hit when the ball landed on my face. What was supposed to be a fun, 3 day get-away turned into an emergency trip to the dentist to get my tooth shoved back into my gums. I’ll spare you the gore, but blood, puking, swelling, stitches, strange glue holding my teeth together, infection, a round of antibiotics shot directly into my left cheek (not the one of my face), and innumerable dentists visits are all a part of my story. 
However, not until many years later did the UPS get involved. 
You see, whatever dental magic was done to me between that fateful day and on through my early 30’s was no longer doing it’s job and I needed a dental implant. The prosthetic dentist told me this was a fairly easy process and set my appointment. Since my dentist was 40 mi…

Make new friends but keep the old, some are silver and the other is gold

Women Are Scary (book review)
Honestly, I was a bit skeptical of this book. I am not a fan of fluffy reads nor books that are overtly girly. It’s like the girly gab oozes through sometimes and I can’t handle the silly remarks. But, I was wrong. Melanie Dale is hysterical. I am a huge fan of clean, stand-up comedy and I was literally laughing aloud in my backyard while I read her book. While I sat with the kids outside, I chuckled through the first few chapters before I had to shake the sand out of the baby’s clothes and do tick checks. Melanie also found a way to win out past mom-to-three-exhaustion at night and I kept picking up her semi-scary covered book. 
Woven in between her super funny stories, Melanie (I pretend she and I are on first name basis because she replied to my facebook comment about what “base” moms are on when they take over the kids’ trampoline) gets real with the fears and frustrations moms of all walks of life face when wanting friends. 
Being a part time working/s…